VIDEO

Thursday, March 24th at 8:30 pm
Noritaka Tatehana and Kanjuro Kiritake III, Japanese Puppet Show / Bunraku
[Bunraku puppet theater, followed by an opportunity to meet the artists]

For this Nomadic Night, Japanese contemporary artist Noritaka Tatehana - renowned for designing dizzyingly high, heelless shoes, made famous by singer Lady Gaga and inspired by wooden clogs Japanese courtesans (Oirans) wore - has joined forces with Kanjuro Kiritake III, the uncontested master of bunraku in Osaka, to create an original Japanese puppet show.

Recognized as a UNESCO Oral Intangible Cultural Heritage since 2009, bunraku is a traditional Japanese puppet theater operated by three different elements of Ningyotukai (puppeteers), Tayu (chanters), and shamisen musicians.

Noritaka Tatehana presents a play which consists of three-act short stories unfolded by three courtesans with performers trailed by prestigious puppeteer Kanjuro Kiritake from the prominent puppeteer family. A significant troupe specially formed for the title to expand the beauty of bunraku only at Fondation Cartier, scenic art and costumes would be handled by Tatehana. Each theatrical scene, costumes and properties are precisely built with Japanese traditional craftsman who portrays historical details, representing stage director's will to preserve and instigate the future of bunraku.

Noritaka Tatehana
Noritaka Tatehana was born in 1985 in Tokyo, into a family running a public bathhouse, “Kabuki-yu,” in Kabukicho in Shinjuku, an entertainment district located in the center of Tokyo. His mother is an instructor of Waldorf dolls, used in Waldorf or Steiner education. His parents raised him in the historic city of Kamakura, where his creativity was cultivated. At the Tokyo University of the Arts, Tatehana studied fine arts and Japanese crafts, and later majored in dyeing and weaving. While at university, he was engaged in the study of oiran or the courtesans in Meiji period. In the meantime, he created kimono and geta using Yūzen-zome, the traditional Japanese dyeing method. As a contemporary artist, Tatehana currently takes part in exhibitions around the world and actively creates his works that incorporate handicrafts of the Japanese traditional craftsmen that have been passed on for generations. Tatehana’s works are held in the public collections of museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Victoria and Albert Museum.

Kanjuro Kiritake III
Kanjuro Kiritake III was born in Osaka in 1953, as the son of the prominent bunraku puppeteer, Kanjuro Kiritake II, who was designated a Living National Treasure by the Japanese government. In 1967, he became a puppetry trainee of the Bunraku Association and apprenticed himself under Minosuke Yoshida III. His first performance on stage took place in the following year. He performs both male and female roles, having learned tachiyaku (male lead) from his father and onnagata (female role) from Minosuke, the master puppeteer of onnagata. In 2003, he succeeded to his father’s stage name and became Kanjuro Kiritake III. In addition to performing, Kanjuro Kiritake III is actively engaged in activities that contribute to the development and succession of bunraku. These activities include teaching how to perform, conducting workshops both in Japan and overseas, producing new plays, and more. He has been awarded many prizes such as the prestigious Shijuhosho (Purple Ribbon Medal) by the government of Japan, the Japan Art Academy Prize for his contribution to academic and artistic developments and also for his excellence in his performance.

Information
Seated concert, unassigned seating.

The show begins at the precise time: access to latecomers spectators may be refused or subject to certain conditions and gives no right to any refund.

Noritaka Tatehana et Kanjuro Kiritake III © Noritaka Tatehana

GALLERY

  • © Olivier Ouadah

  • © Olivier Ouadah

  • © Olivier Ouadah

  • © Olivier Ouadah

  • © Olivier Ouadah

  • © Olivier Ouadah

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